Posts Tagged ‘outdoors’

Top 200 Places: Wolf River Canoe and Kayak in Mississippi

Saturday, March 24th, 2012

Wolf River Canoe and Kayak
21652 Tucker Road
Long Beach,
Mississippi 39560
228-452-7666

The Wolf River is well known for its white sandy beaches and meandering waterways, and offers plenty of fun for the experienced or amateur recreationalist. Dogs are allowed on the watercraft rentals for an additional fee of $5. Dogs must be under their owner’s control at all times.


Top 200 Places

DogFriendly.com, with tens of thousands of places listed to take your dog to, will be releasing on it’s Dog News blog, Facebook page and on Twitter a list of 200 Top Places that you can take your dog in the U.S. and Canada. This list, while intended to highlight top places that are especially pet-friendly, is not designed to be the absolutely top 200 places that we could find, but a sampling of the top places so that all regions, types of attractions, hotels, B&Bs, vacation rentals, parks, beaches, shopping and more can be considered. No doubt each of you will find many other places not on this list or our full list of dog-friendly places at http://www.dogfriendly.com. Please let us know about them by commenting on the blog or emailing us at email@dogfriendly.com. You can also let us and our readers know if you agree or disagree with the selections, or your experiences there. Please keep in mind that places often change their policies regarding dogs and thus may have different policies at any time in the future.

The blog entries can be found at http://dogfriendly.com/dognews/?cat=243, our Facebook page, or Twitter.

Tips On How To Survive Summer Heat with your Dog

Sunday, July 31st, 2011

SEAACA (Southeast Area Animal Control Authority; www.seaaca.org) is helping pet owners and animal lovers with useful tips on how to survive the summer’s high temperatures. In the summer heat, many cats, dogs, and other pets can suffer from a wide variety of ailments, including dehydration, exhaustion, heat stroke, and more. With a few preventive measures and safety precautions, however, pet owners can protect their beloved animals and help them enjoy these fun months.

Here are some important tips:

1. Drink Up. Ensure your pets always have cool, clean water that is easily accessible. Drinking water is the best way for pets to avoid dehydration. Plus, remember that water warms up fast, so replace water dishes frequently to keep them cool and clean.

2. Keep It Cool. Make sure your air conditioning is on, or that your windows and doors are open. Cross-ventilate to keep air moving through your home. You can also cover windows by using shades, blinds, and curtains to block the hot sunlight during the day.

3. Not In the Car. Never, under any circumstances, leave your pet in a car. Within just a few minutes of being trapped in a hot car, your pet’s temperature can rise to dangerous and lethal levels. And remember, rolling down the windows or parking in the shade while your animal is in a car is not acceptable.

4. Take It Easy. Too much exercise, particularly in the middle of the day, can exhaust your pet during the hot summer months (especially for older pets, short-nosed dogs, and pets with thick coats). Try to take walks and exercise with your pet in the morning or evening, when the temperature is cooler. Also, avoid walking on hot concrete or asphalt and instead use soft grass areas if possible.

5. Don’t Get Buggy. Fleas and ticks can be extra problematic during the summer. Make sure to use flea and tick treatments recommended by your veterinarian, as over-the-counter products can be toxic to some animals.

6. Apply the Lotion. Some pets can get sunburned, especially if they have light-skinned and exposed flesh on their noses, ears, and other body parts. Talk to your veterinarian and apply appropriate sunscreen to your pet’s vulnerable areas.

7. Watch It. Pets can’t tell you they’re stressed by the heat, but you can notice multiple telltale signs. These include heavy panting, constant thirst, dizziness, lethargy, unusual clumsiness, fast heartbeats, glazed or unresponsive eyes, vomiting, excessive salivation, and deep red or purple tongue color. If your pet exhibits any of these characteristics or behaviors, contact your veterinarian or animal hospital immediately.

8. Take Action. If your pet is succumbing to the heat, here are actions you can take before seeking professional medical assistance: move your pet into a shaded or cooler area; place your pet in cool (not ice cold) water; apply cold towels or ice packs to your pet’s head, neck and chest; help your pet suck on ice cubes or drink water.

“The summer is a time to play and have fun, but it also unfortunately can be a dangerous period for our favorite pets,” noted SEAACA Executive Director, Dan Morrison. “We are here to spread the word and give pet owners tips on how to help animals survive the heat. A few precautions can save a pet’s life,” he added.

For more information about SEAACA, please visit www.seaaca.org.