Why Do Dogs Eat Grass?

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As long as the grass is free of any pesticides or herbicides, grass is safe and normal for dogs to munch on. The reasons why some dogs regularly eat grass are all over the place, but here are some of the most common ones:

  1. Stomach relief

You might have seen dogs throw up after eating grass, which might be caused by the strange texture or taste of the plant. While only about 1 in 5 dogs regularly vomit after eating grass, some dogs do it to help an upset stomach. By vomiting, dogs are able to purge their stomachs of any acids or foods that don’t agree with them to feel better. 

  1. Diet Deficiencies

Dogs need a well-balanced diet in order to keep them in good health. When their dietary needs aren’t met, some dogs may resort to eating grass in an effort to fix the issue. If your dog is regularly eating large amounts of grass, it’s a good idea to contact your vet. 

  1. Boredom

Some dogs eat grass just to eat grass. In my experience, if your dog is outside and unstimulated by toys, companionship, or exercise, they may resort to nibbling on grass. A good way to correct this behavior is to keep dogs entertained and moving while outside, and having them cool down away from your yard instead. 

  1. Instinct

Because dogs evolved from wolves (who eat primarily herbivorous prey), dogs may have an instinctual desire to get those nutrients from grass since they cannot get them from the insides of wild animals. 

  1. Enjoyment

Some dogs just enjoy the taste of grass. If it’s freshly watered or dewy from the rain, some dogs eat it for hydration. To prevent this, make sure your pup has access to clean drinking water both indoors and outdoors. 

Overall, eating grass is a normal behavior of domesticated dogs. While the reasons for doing so vary, eating grass is safe so long as it’s not eaten in excess. If you notice your dog eating large amounts of grass, contact your vet to try and find alternative snacks for your pooch. 

Abigail Kurten
Author: Abigail Kurten

Hi! My name's Abigail, and I intern as a Content Writer for DogFriendly.com. I have one dog, a chocolate lab named Riley who's the best! My favorite breed of dog is a Bulldog or Saint Bernard, though.

Abigail Kurten
Author: Abigail Kurten

Hi! My name's Abigail, and I intern as a Content Writer for DogFriendly.com. I have one dog, a chocolate lab named Riley who's the best! My favorite breed of dog is a Bulldog or Saint Bernard, though.

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